[-] ptz 1 points 2 hours ago

Oh, cool. So Peertube follows in Lemmy do seem to work. Someone said they didn't, and this is the only channel I'm following, so I wasn't sure.

Question: Do Peertube videos in a channel only federate out if you tell them to? Trying to figure out if there's something in Lemmy not working right with PT or if it's just that not all videos federate out.

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submitted 19 hours ago* (last edited 19 hours ago) by ptz to c/its_a_unix_system

Was watching with my nieces/nephews and had to pause for a screenshot. Not only does it look like Lemmy, it bears a somewhat striking resemblance to the Tesseract UI I develop.

Screenshot of Tesseract for comparison:

[-] ptz 11 points 1 day ago

I feel an easy and rational solution is to criminalize a certain category of defamation… presenting something untrue/fabricated as true/real or in a way that it could be construed as true/real.

I would love that solution, but it definitely wouldn't have bipartisan support.

[-] ptz 69 points 2 days ago

So should the accompanying level of stupidity.

[-] ptz 40 points 2 days ago

god only punishes blue states. when it happens to red states, it's their faith being tested. 🙄

[-] ptz 15 points 2 days ago

I just want a 'dear leader' like the fascists have, is that so wrong?

Cult. That's called a cult. You probably don't actually want that.

[-] ptz 15 points 2 days ago

Stink Floyd

[-] ptz 9 points 2 days ago

Dark Matter (the other one: the Canadian sci-fi show) had something called Transfer Transit kinda like that.

They scan you and rapidly grow a clone at your destination with all your memories. Clone has like a 3-5 day lifespan, but is otherwise "you". It goes and does whatever you planned to do at the far end.

The main you stays behind and does whatever until the clone returns to a Transfer Transit pod on the far end. It's memories are then uploaded to you and the clone disintegrates. You now " remember" everything the clone did on your behalf as if you did it personally.

[-] ptz 28 points 3 days ago* (last edited 3 days ago)

Theme checks out and is taken up to 11 in Lower Decks:

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submitted 3 days ago* (last edited 3 days ago) by ptz to c/quarks@startrek.website

The researchers did indeed discover a warp drive solution: a method of manipulating space so that travelers can move without accelerating. There is no such thing as a free lunch, however, and the physicality of this warp drive does come with a major caveat: the vessel and passengers can never travel faster than light. Also disappointing: the fact that the researchers behind the new work don't seem to bother with figuring out what configurations of matter would allow the warping to happen.

[-] ptz 9 points 3 days ago
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submitted 3 days ago by ptz to c/80smusic@lemmy.world
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ABBA - Waterloo [1974] (www.youtube.com)
submitted 3 days ago by ptz to c/70smusic@lemmy.world
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submitted 3 days ago by ptz to c/80smusic@lemmy.world
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submitted 3 days ago by ptz to c/90smusic@lemmy.world
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submitted 3 days ago by ptz to c/80smusic@lemmy.world

There's no 50's music community to post the original Ritchie Valens version, so here's a 1987 cover.

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submitted 3 days ago by ptz to c/90smusic@lemmy.world
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submitted 3 days ago by ptz to c/90smusic@lemmy.world
[-] ptz 22 points 3 days ago

The funny / sad thing is that this scene is from Death to 2020 and they're running the same playbook as they did 4 years ago.

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submitted 3 days ago by ptz to c/politicalmemes@lemmy.world
[-] ptz 28 points 3 days ago

Jesus christ. And to think these people see themselves as the good guys.

[-] ptz 14 points 3 days ago* (last edited 3 days ago)

"I've said it before, and I'll say it again:"

What about Hunter Biden?

Source: Lisa Kudrow's Best Scenes in 'Death to 2020'

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submitted 5 days ago* (last edited 5 days ago) by ptz to c/privacy@programming.dev

Apple and the satellite-based broadband service Starlink each recently took steps to address new research into the potential security and privacy implications of how their services geo-locate devices. Researchers from the University of Maryland say they relied on publicly available data from Apple to track the location of billions of devices globally -- including non-Apple devices like Starlink systems -- and found they could use this data to monitor the destruction of Gaza, as well as the movements and in many cases identities of Russian and Ukrainian troops. At issue is the way that Apple collects and publicly shares information about the precise location of all Wi-Fi access points seen by its devices. Apple collects this location data to give Apple devices a crowdsourced, low-power alternative to constantly requesting global positioning system (GPS) coordinates.

Both Apple and Google operate their own Wi-Fi-based Positioning Systems (WPS) that obtain certain hardware identifiers from all wireless access points that come within range of their mobile devices. Both record the Media Access Control (MAC) address that a Wi-FI access point uses, known as a Basic Service Set Identifier or BSSID. Periodically, Apple and Google mobile devices will forward their locations -- by querying GPS and/or by using cellular towers as landmarks -- along with any nearby BSSIDs. This combination of data allows Apple and Google devices to figure out where they are within a few feet or meters, and it's what allows your mobile phone to continue displaying your planned route even when the device can't get a fix on GPS.

With Google's WPS, a wireless device submits a list of nearby Wi-Fi access point BSSIDs and their signal strengths -- via an application programming interface (API) request to Google -- whose WPS responds with the device's computed position. Google's WPS requires at least two BSSIDs to calculate a device's approximate position. Apple's WPS also accepts a list of nearby BSSIDs, but instead of computing the device's location based off the set of observed access points and their received signal strengths and then reporting that result to the user, Apple's API will return the geolocations of up to 400 hundred more BSSIDs that are nearby the one requested. It then uses approximately eight of those BSSIDs to work out the user's location based on known landmarks.

In essence, Google's WPS computes the user's location and shares it with the device. Apple's WPS gives its devices a large enough amount of data about the location of known access points in the area that the devices can do that estimation on their own. That's according to two researchers at the University of Maryland, who theorized they could use the verbosity of Apple's API to map the movement of individual devices into and out of virtually any defined area of the world. The UMD pair said they spent a month early in their research continuously querying the API, asking it for the location of more than a billion BSSIDs generated at random. They learned that while only about three million of those randomly generated BSSIDs were known to Apple's Wi-Fi geolocation API, Apple also returned an additional 488 million BSSID locations already stored in its WPS from other lookups.>Apple and the satellite-based broadband service Starlink each recently took steps to address new research into the potential security and privacy implications of how their services geo-locate devices. Researchers from the University of Maryland say they relied on publicly available data from Apple to track the location of billions of devices globally — including non-Apple devices like Starlink systems — and found they could use this data to monitor the destruction of Gaza, as well as the movements and in many cases identities of Russian and Ukrainian troops.

"Plotting the locations returned by Apple's WPS between November 2022 and November 2023, Levin and Rye saw they had a near global view of the locations tied to more than two billion Wi-Fi access points," the report adds. "The map showed geolocated access points in nearly every corner of the globe, apart from almost the entirety of China, vast stretches of desert wilderness in central Australia and Africa, and deep in the rainforests of South America."

The researchers wrote: "We observe routers move between cities and countries, potentially representing their owner's relocation or a business transaction between an old and new owner. While there is not necessarily a 1-to-1 relationship between Wi-Fi routers and users, home routers typically only have several. If these users are vulnerable populations, such as those fleeing intimate partner violence or a stalker, their router simply being online can disclose their new location."

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submitted 5 days ago* (last edited 5 days ago) by ptz to c/announcements

If you've noticed content from Lemmy World lagging by a few hours the past few days, it's not just you.

Long story short, it's a problem with how Lemmy sends activities, and it's heavily impacted by latency between sending and receiving server and creates a fixed upper limit on the number of activities per second that can be sent. Lemmy World is hosted in Finland, and DubVee on the US east coast. There's only so much I can do to work around the inherent latency of a trans-Atlantic link.

We're not alone in this. Some instances, particularly in Australia, New Zealand, and US west coast, are impacted more dramatically.

While there's always some federation delay/backlog, it only escalates to noticeable levels every so often. Not sure why, but I've gone over our infrastructure top to bottom several times and cannot find any reason, on this end, for these events. The graph in the post shows the number of activities Dubvee is lagging behind Lemmy World over the last 30 days.

Normally, it's 300-500 activities which usually corresponds to a minute or less of lag between LW sending an event and DubVee processing it. Occasionally, when LW gets busy, we see spikes into the 3000-5000 range (~5-7 minutes of lag). Every so often, though, there will be huge backlog events (the spikes from 15K to 35K) which often take 8-12 hours to catch up. A month or two ago, I think the largest spike was around 180,000 (though that was a separate issue).

I believe this is being addressed in Lemmy itself, but it'll be a while before it's ready (and I'm certainly going to let other instances kick the tires before upgrading).

In the mean time, I've talked with some other admins and have deployed a Federation proxy. I won't go into the nitty-gritty details, but it does seem to be alleviating a lot, but not all, of the congestion. We went from averaging around 10,000 backlogged events to about 2500. So, definitely an improvement.

Update: Buffer has cleared, and things seem to be coming in pretty close to real time. Occasionally the buffer kicks in, but overall, it appears to be helping. Will continue to monitor. Usually 11-12 AM eastern time is when we start to see lag increasing in activities coming from Lemmy World.

Hopefully there's some more optimization I can do in the mean time, and hopefully Lemmy addresses this limitation, but for now, this should make things less bad.

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ptz

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